Nelson A. Wivel, MD

Wivel, Nelson 3792083_25504045 TP

Title: Emeritus Active
Company: Institute of Human Gene Therapy, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine
Location: Haverford, Pennsylvania, United States

Nelson A. Wivel, Emeritus Active at the Institute of Human Gene Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, has been recognized by Marquis Who’s Who Top Doctors for dedication, achievements, and leadership in medical research.

The first in his family to become a physician, Dr. Wivel decided in college that he wanted to pursue medicine. He had always been interested in science, and wanted to do his part to advance the field. He proceeded to earn a Bachelor of Science from Eastern New Mexico University in 1957 and an MD from Stanford University in 1961, as well as a diploma from the American Board of Pathology. Dr. Wivel then became an intern and an assistant resident in medicine at Cornell University, an assistant resident in pathology at Stanford University, and a research trainee in pathology from Washington University in St. Louis. His career really took off after that; he served as the head of the Ultrastructural Studies Section at the National Cancer Institute from 1966 to 1970, the head of the Ultrastructural Biology Section at the National Cancer Institute from 1970 to 1986, a medical officer for AIDS research at the General Clinical Research Centers of the National Institutes of Health from 1986 to 1989, the director of the Office of Recombinant DNA Activities at the General Clinical Research Centers of the National Institutes of Health from 1986 to 1996, and the deputy director of the Institute of Human Gene Therapy at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine from 1996 to 2007. Today, he holds the title of emeritus active at the institution. He is also the associate editor of the Journal of Bio-Law and Business and the executive director and biotechnology consultant of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee of the National Institutes of Health.

The highlight of Dr. Wivel’s career was publishing a paper based on his fairly complicated series of experiments on cell fractionation in trying to study and characterize a particular type of virus. Adding to the victory, four other laboratories separately and independently repeated their work. Additionally, Dr. Wivel is proud of his work on the gene therapy program; he was there when the first patient was treated in 1990, and now there are more than 1,800. Looking to the future, he hopes to see the continued development of gene therapy.

For more:

Lifetime Achievement

Contact Dr. Wivel

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